Two Reasons You Should Believe in Your Writing

Remember the excitement you had when you read the first story you wrote? Remember how you thought your plot was riveting, your characters real and your voice amazing? No? Me neither. Because for as long as I can remember, I’ve wished to create plots and characters like the ones other authors created. And too many times, I’ve wished that my voice could be like other authors’ voices. Each day, I have to remind myself that I have every right to believe in my own writing. Because I know I’m not alone, today I’m sharing the main two reasons you should believe in your writing, too.

1. Only you have your voice

It’s easy to wish you could tell stories like other authors do. It’s much, much harder to want to tell stories like you do. It sounds strange, I know. But it can happen. Think about that time you read something you wrote and thought, Wow, this is great. It doesn’t have to be the entire book; just a phrase, a sentence, or anything that made you proud of the way you said something.

Okay, now use that feeling to realise that it’s your voice that made it possible. Your voice. Because you wrote that thing. Over time, your voice will develop. One day the phrases you’re proud of will become sentences, and the sentences, paragraphs. Some day the paragraphs will turn into chapters, and the chapters into books. This can’t happen if you keep wishing to have someone else’s voice. It can’t happen if you focus on what your voice isn’t as opposed to what it is. Only you have your voice. Believe in it.

2. Only you can tell your stories

This one is harder than the previous one, mostly because stories change. Some stories are good; some aren’t that good. And unless you’re writing about something in a complete bubble and in complete ignorance, no story is bad. Because every story provides you with an opportunity to learn. Each story will teach you more about yourself as a writer. You’ll learn whether you prefer beta heroes over alpha heroes; whether you’re comfortable writing sex; whether you prefer dialogue or introspection. You’ll learn. And your stories – your stories – are the best way for you to learn.

And only you are able to tell them.

Do you have any advice or reasons for authors to believe in their writing? What would you tell an author who is having a crisis of faith? Comment below or share it on Twitter or Facebook!